Interesting Reading

Some Occasions It’s Worth Seeing Your Doctor

There are some patients who have no problem going to their doctor with anything they have a question about or when they aren’t feeling well. However, there are others who hardly ever go to their doctor, even if they are sick or in pain. Most of the time, this doesn’t mean they’re trying to be tough or think the doctor can’t help. On the contrary, many people aren’t sure when it’s serious enough to go to their doctor.

Prolonged Muscle Soreness

Often times, someone will experience sore muscles after trying a new exercise or any physical activity that the body isn’t used. Most of the time, it will last for a couple of days. However, if the soreness lasts for a week or longer, it could be time to get your doctor on the phone. In rare situations, prolonged muscle soreness from intense exercising could be associated with rhabdomyolysis, which can lead to permanent kidney damage if untreated.

Chronic Low-back Pain

The older you get, the more likely you are to get stiffness or aches on your neck, back, and shoulders. Usually, with a bit of stretching and over the counter medications such as paracetamol or ibuprofen it may dissipate. However, chronic pain in your lower back could be a red flag if there is also pain or tingling down your leg. This could mean you’ve slipped or herniated a disc, or a pinched nerve root. This type of injury calls for medical attention and you should phone your doctor immediately.

You’re Sick For a Month

Many things in medicine get better with the course of time. However, if your symptoms persist longer than you or your relatives would expect, or if something “mild” persists for up to a month, it’s worth getting checked out. If your symptoms are persisting, what you have may not be a “simple” transient issue, and it’s worth having your doctor check you out to help diagnose and treat you.

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The Transition For Children From Paediatric Care

When it’s time to move from paediatrics to adult care, the transition can be difficult for some, particularly for those with significant disabilities who have needed ongoing paediatric care since they were infants. While it may sound as simple as moving from one doctor to another, many parents struggle with knowing the right time or wondering how different it will be for their child. Here’s what to expect when transitioning from paediatric to adult care:

The Right Time for the Transition

When it comes to deciding the right time to transition away from paediatric care, there is no one answer for this. Transitioning from paediatric to adult care usually occurs around the 18th birthday. However, in reality, it is a case-by-case basis. It all depends on the patient, their health history, and much more. When you’re thinking about taking your child out of paediatric care, it’s always best to consult their doctor first to decide when would be the right time. 

The Role of the Pediatrician 

Under their care, a paediatrician will help prepare your child for the transition to an adult physician. As the patient grows older, paediatricians will begin to see patients in private when they’re in their early teen years, depending on the level of disability. As adolescents begin to learn real-life responsibilities such as driving or getting their first job, they also need to learn how to advocate for themselves when it comes to their health. 

The Consent of Treatment

There is a principle called the “mature minor”, it is different from state to state and country to country. What that means is that some point, between the ages of 14 and 16, the doctor determines if the child has the maturity to understand and consent to the treatment they are having. If they are ‘mature’ enough to consent, then their consultation is confidential. As such, when a patient is at the age of consent, they no longer have to disclose anything medically related to their parents. This means that whatever is discussed between the patient and their doctor will stay between them. 

The Difficulties with Getting a COVID-19 Vax

Throughout every country, the dangers of the worldwide pandemic, coronavirus, still linger. Although some populations have begun to get back to the way it used to be slowly, many are still worried about the likely second wave of coronavirus, also known as COVID-19. Looking at countries in the Southern Hemisphere that up until late June appeared to have had COVID-19 well under control (like Australia), there has been a large surge in cases in July as the typical winter respiratory infection season arrives. In January 2021, when many are fed-up with social distancing, there may well be a huge rise in cases in the Northern Hemisphere respiratory infection season. Many are hoping for a vaccine to help stop the spread of the dangerous virus. However, there are difficulties with getting a COVID-19 vax.

Developing a brand new vaccine is a significant medical and scientific discovery. It can take decades to finally find a successful vax, even with the urgency of the situation. Remember drug companies are motivated by profits – if a drug is likely to be profitable, they’ll pour more money into trying to develop it. Coronaviruses are one of the main causes of the common cold (as well as rhinoviruses, RSV and parainfluenza). Almost all of us get at least one cold every winter. So there would be a huge incentive to developing a successful vaccine to a disease we all get every year. There has never been a successful vaccine to a coronavirus. Why will it be different with COVID-19? Hopefully, it will be different, but we have to be realists. 

Also, studies have shown that those people who acquire COVID-19 have a rapid drop off in their natural immunity – 23-fold in only a few months! The immune system generally builds a more robust response to “naturally” acquired infections, than to vaccines. So if a vaccine is developed, people may need to be re-vaccinated at least every 3 months. 

Once the corona vax is created, many people may be fearful about getting vaccinated. Even with the vaccine tested and numerous trials are done, it’s difficult for people to trust a new vaccine entirely. These are reasonable concerns. It is wise not to be an ‘early adopter’ of new medications, often side-effects become more well known once the medication has been in broad community use after the initial trial phases. 

Facing the Reality of a Vaccine

While a COVID-19 vax could help billions of people around the world, it’s essential to be realistic. Probably within the first few weeks of distributing a vaccine, there will be countless stories about side effects, medical syndromes, and scary reactions. Even for someone who is pro-vaccine, this could be scary to hear. It’s important to be realistic that many people are going to be scared to take the vaccine, not based on science, but on the horror stories spread around. Many people are probably going to want to wait before getting vaccinated, which is entirely understandable. 

This means if a vax if found and ready to be given to the public, it won’t stop the pandemic in its tracks. It will definitely take time. 

Asking Your Doctor the Tough Questions

When it comes to health and medicine, the best person to talk to is your doctor. However, sometimes the tough or even embarrassing questions are not easy to ask. While a lot of people understand that their doctor is there to help them, many still have a tough time working up the courage to speak up about health questions or concerns because it can feel too embarrassing. Take a look at these tips for asking your doctor the tough questions:

 

Prioritise Concerns

Often times, doctors only have about 15-20 minutes to talk with their patients. When you have a line of questions for your doctor, have them prepared ahead of time by writing a list. By preparing, it can help you get used to the idea of asking and make it easier to ask. It’s also a good idea to ask your tough questions at the start of your appointment. This way, your doctor has more time to give you a quality answer and explanation. 

 

Use Your Own Words

Chances are, you tried researching the tough question online already before working up the courage to ask your doctor. While this can sometimes be helpful, it’s important to tell your doctor how you’re feeling or why the concern has been raised in your own words. Using your own words is better than spewing medical terms you read on the internet. You can even write down your symptoms or experiences beforehand to make sure you tell your doctor everything they need to know. 

 

They’ve Probably Heard it Before

Your doctor has spent many years studying the medical field and has probably seen many patients before you. Whatever ever tough or embarrassing question you want to ask, they have probably heard it before. Never be too scared to ask because you’re afraid they’ll judge or think it’s strange. 

 

It’s Their Profession

When it comes down to it, a doctor’s job is to answer any medical question that their patient has. As their patient, you have a professional relationship that allows you to be completely open about your medical concerns and they are there to help you. Being too embarrassed to ask the tough questions can put a damper on your health and do more harm than good. Be sure to always be open and honest with your doctor. 

Resilience – 3 characteristics to help through life’s traumas

Trials, trauma and tough roads, we all will face them in life. Some more often and some in more tragic ways than others. Relationship breakdown, death of loved ones, job loss, financial difficulty, medical illnesses and other life events can all throw us into despair. 
How do we deal with such tragedies and grief? 
Resilience researcher and fellow traveller in the world of emotional trauma, Lucy Hone, believes that developing emotional resilience is one of the best ways to both healthily grieve and live our lives concurrently. She believes that resilient people have 3 key characteristics. She says:

1. “Resilient people get that s#*t happens. They know that suffering is part of life. This doesn’t mean they actually welcome it in…. Just that when the tough times come, they seem to know that suffering is part of every human existence.”

2. “Resilient people are really good at choosing carefully where they select their attention. They have a habit of realistically appraising situations, and typically, managing to focus on the things that they can change, and somehow accept the things that they can’t. This is a vital, learnable skill for resilience. Make an intentional, deliberate, ongoing effort to tune into what’s good in your world.”

This characteristic is fundamental to a famous prayer known as “The Serenity Prayer” which prays to God: “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.”

3. ‘Resilient people ask themselves, “Is what I’m doing helping or harming me?“‘

https://www.ted.com/talks/lucy_hone_3_secrets_of_resilient_people?utm_source=recommendation&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=explore&utm_term=newest-talks-4

When you go through life’s traumas, as we all will, find a great counselor or psychologist to get you through, and some good mentors too – some close friends who are not merely “yes” people to help shape and gently guide you on your journey. And on that journey learn to accept that suffering is part of life, focus on what you can change and accept the things you cannot change, and stop doing the things which reactivate your distress.

God-willing these strategies can help you survive, take the next steps, move on and transform in your life.

Dr Lachlan Soper

Wisdom from Jewish Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl – Success, Happiness and Pleasure

I’ve had the privilege of going through Viktor Frankl’s book, “Man’s Search for Meaning” lately.
Here’s one quote, worth reading twice, on success and happiness:
“Don’t aim at success. The more you aim at it and make it a target, the more you’re going to miss it. For success, like happiness, cannot be pursued, it must ensue. And it only does so as the unintended side effect of ones personal dedication to a cause greater than oneself, or as the byproduct of one’s surrender to a person other than oneself. Happiness must happen, and the same holds for success, you have to let it happen by not caring about it…. In the long run… success will follow you precisely because you had forgotten to think about it”
“Pleasure is, and must remain a side-effect or by-product, and is destroyed and spoiled to the degree to which it is made a goal in itself. Hence the failure of hedonism”.

Dr Lachlan Soper

Ingredients to great conversation. Be prepared to be amazed – Celeste Headlee

In this talk by Celeste Headlee, she outlines the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. And most importantly, “be prepared to be amazed.”

Most of us need to be challenged to apply our minds to what we hear, before we engage our mouths to add our opinion.

10 Rules for better conversations:

  1. Don’t multitask. Be present. Be in that moment. Don’t be half in the conversation
  2. Enter every conversation assuming you have something to learn. Everybody is an expert in something
  3. Use open ended questions. Who, what, where, when, why or how? What was that like? How did that feel? It gives a more interesting response.
  4. Go with the flow. If thoughts come into your mind, let them go.
  5. If you don’t know, say that you don’t know.
  6. Don’t equate your experience with theirs. Their loss of a family member, job loss vs your family loss or job loss. Their and your experiences are different.
  7. Try not to repeat yourself. It’s condescending and boring.
  8. Stay out of the weeds. People don’t care about the years, names, dates… They care about you, what you are like, what you have in common.
  9. Listen. Keep your mouth shut as often as you possibly can. Keep your mind open. Always be prepared to be amazed.
  10. Be brief.

 

“Conversational competence might be the single most overlooked skill we fail to teach.

Kids spend hours each day engaging with ideas and each other through screens. But rarely do they have the opportunity to hone their interpersonal communication skills. Is there any 21st Century skill more important than being able to sustain competent confident conversation. Paul Barnwell, High School Teacher

Listen on: ted.com

Dr Lachlan Soper

C.S. Lewis on pain

“God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks to us in our conscience, but shouts to us in our pains”

C.S. Lewis

Dr Lachlan Soper

The benefits of decluttering

This season in life was one I never sought after. BUT there have been so many opportunities to grasp a hold of. One of the small opportunities is decluttering.

“Minimalism is the intentional promotion of the things we most value, and the removal of the things that distract us from it”
Benefits include more time with family & generosity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVbQ-oro7FQ

Dr Lachlan Soper

The Paradox of Choice

A thought provoking talk about the paradox of choice.
The multitude of choice we have leads to paralysis rather than freedom. People put off decisions.
The second consequence is that even if we overcome the paralysis to make a choice, we become less satisfied with the choice we’ve made.
The opportunity cost of missing out on the option you could have chosen detracts from the enjoyment of the choice you made even if it was an excellent decision.
“I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want.”
Apostle Paul

Read full article on: ted.com

Dr Lachlan Soper