Author Archives: Renee Montalvan

Pros and Cons of Virtual Doctor Visits

Even before the pandemic struck, virtual doctor visits were becoming more and more popular. Now with so many people confined to their homes and the doctor’s office not being as safe as it used to be, virtual visits and telehealth communication have become a necessity. However, virtual visits have their advantages and disadvantages. When it comes down to it, is it worth it in the end?

Pro: Cost-effective Care

Oftentimes, a virtual visit with your doctor is going to be less expensive than a traditional visit to their office. A patient can actually save money by removing the time spent sitting in the waiting room and commuting to the clinic. Virtual care appointments also decrease no-show and late appointment rates.

Pro: Convenient and Accessible

Many patients found virtual visits to be easier and much more convenient. Instead of taking time out of their day to drive down to the clinic and wait for the doctor, they can access care right from the comfort of their home or wherever they have an internet connection. Telehealth is also a great option for those living in rural areas and remote locations. They can gain access to doctors more easily while also having quicker and more convenient access to specialists. 

Pro: Better Patient Engagement

Patients are more likely to set and keep their appointments when made through telehealth solutions. Virtual visits also encourage patients to be more involved by making it easier to reach out with questions, voice concerns, share early warning signs, and schedule a follow-up appointment. With the patient-centered approaches that telehealth offers, there’s a major improvement to patient care.

Con: More Training and Tech Equipment

Moving care to a virtual platform requires more training in tech and requires equipment. This restructures the IT staff’s responsibilities, which costs both time and money. To ensure patients are getting the best care possible with virtual visits, training for doctors, nurses, and other medical staff is crucial. 

Con: Less In-Person Consultations

Technology has its limitations and cannot completely replace in-person consultations. However, the appeal and convenience of virtual visits will make in-person visits seem like even more of a hassle, even when it is necessary. Not all procedures, especially a checkup, can be performed digitally. 

At the end of the day, as good as tele-health is, nothing can replace an experienced doctors’ gut feel when a patient walks in their door, and there is no substitute for a thorough clinical examination. 

Telehealth is a worthwhile supplement to good patient care, but should never replace it, as things will get missed.

DISCLAIMER

All content provided on the www.lachlansoper.com.au website is general in nature and for informational purposes only.  It does not take into consideration an individual’s circumstances and it is not advice and should not be used as a substitute for advice from an appropriately qualified professional.

Opinions are my own. Links to external websites do not constitute an endorsement or recommendation.

No responsibility is accepted for any liability, loss or risk which is incurred as a consequence of the use of any of the material or links on this website, nor for any errors or omissions in the information.

All content on this website © Lachlan Soper (unless otherwise specified).

Digital Health Trends

Innovative technology has changed our lives and improved our day-to-day. As industries embrace and adapt to new technologies, they’re finding ways to improve customer service, communication, and even employee satisfaction. The healthcare industry is truly embracing technology and seeing the advantages of digital trends. It is reshaping how patients interact with health professionals, data is shared more easily among providers, and it is changing treatment plan decisions as well as health outcomes.

Records in the Cloud

Thanks to tech advancements, over the years more and more medical records are moved into cloud storage. This type of cloud infrastructure is key to having easy access between disparate systems. Healthcare organisations using the cloud for storage understand that it is the best way to hold large amounts of medical data that accumulates every day. It’s also an easy way to share information, images, and records across different healthcare providers and organisations. If executed correctly, cloud storage can improve patient care, everyday workflow solutions for physicians, and ensure records remain private and secure. 

Resources such as My Health Record offer an online summary of a patient’s key health information. This information can be securely viewed online by the patient or medical professional and gives healthcare providers access to important health data such as allergies, medication, past and present medical conditions, blood tests, and more. 

Wearable Devices 

Tracking your health in real-time has been made possible thanks to innovative wearable devices. Many people are familiar with devices such as fitness trackers, smartwatches, and heart monitors that pair to personal devices. These wearables are now more often being paired with Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) platforms that can send data to their doctor. In the future, we can expect to see wearables playing a major role in healthcare and digital health. These devices can help patients in recovery or assist those with chronic issues. The data that is collected from wearables can help healthcare providers, medical professionals, and patients transform healthcare. 

Virtual Reality

What was once thought of as futuristic recreational technology is now a breakthrough in the healthcare industry. Wearing a Virtual Reality (VR) headset is an immersive experience and is now used by educational institutions to train future doctors. VR is also being used for surgeons to test techniques to prepare for intricate surgeries. What’s more, experienced physicians have used it as a way to practice new procedures and perfect ones they’ve done in the past. There could be even more VR advances in 2021.

 

DISCLAIMER

All content provided on the www.lachlansoper.com.au website is general in nature and for informational purposes only.  It does not take into consideration an individual’s circumstances and it is not advice and should not be used as a substitute for advice from an appropriately qualified professional.

Opinions are my own. Links to external websites do not constitute an endorsement or recommendation.

No responsibility is accepted for any liability, loss or risk which is incurred as a consequence of the use of any of the material or links on this website, nor for any errors or omissions in the information.

All content on this website © Lachlan Soper (unless otherwise specified).

Why Australia’s Covid 19 Response Was Better Than Most

Countries all over the world fell into uncertain times when the coronavirus (Covid 19) began to quickly spread. World leaders had to quickly come up with a plan of action to keep their citizens safe and healthy. Some countries went into strict lockdown, while others’ responses were delayed. It’s no wonder now why there are some countries lifting restrictions and coming out of quarantine while other countries are still having daily death counts approaching the thousands.

Australia had one of the best Covid 19 responses throughout the entire world. Today, almost all of Australia is back to normal with quarantine restrictions lifted and no masks to be seen. There are many reasons why our country has done better than most:

Being an Island

One of the biggest factors that helped Australia go back to normal is being an island. Australia is closed off from the rest of the world with no neighbouring countries to worry about. Much like New Zealand, Vietnam, Brunei and some Caribbean islands, Australia is reporting fewer cases every week. Defeating a virus can definitely be a lot easier when your country is an island and the borders are closed to foreigners, but that isn’t the only factor that helped Australia.

Strict Quarantine

When it was clear the virus was very serious and people’s lives were in danger, Australia went into a very strict quarantine that kept many citizens at home for months, especially in Victoria. Unlike the United States and Europe, the borders were strictly closed to foreigners. Blocking out the rest of the world from entering and keeping Australians from leaving had a huge effect on controlling the spread of the virus. 

For Australian citizens, they had to stay at home unless absolutely necessary. For instance, in Melbourne, Australia’s second-largest city, most people were confined to their homes for 22 hours a day. The only time they were allowed to leave their homes was only for exercise, shopping, schooling, medical appointments, or funerals. These strict rules and regulations helped keep the virus under control and saved many lives. 

Rigorous Contact Tracing

Another strategy Australia has put in place while tackling the virus is its rigorous contact tracing. Australia has adopted a backwards contact-tracing approach to keep coronavirus cases low. Instead of forward contact tracing by finding all the people an infected person could have passed the virus on to and asking them to self-isolate, Australia’s backwards contact tracing aims to find who gave the virus to the person who tested positive, which can potentially pick up infections that might otherwise be missed.

DISCLAIMER

All content provided on the www.lachlansoper.com.au website is general in nature and for informational purposes only.  It does not take into consideration an individual’s circumstances and it is not advice and should not be used as a substitute for advice from an appropriately qualified professional.

Opinions are my own. Links to external websites do not constitute an endorsement or recommendation.

No responsibility is accepted for any liability, loss or risk which is incurred as a consequence of the use of any of the material or links on this website, nor for any errors or omissions in the information.

All content on this website © Lachlan Soper (unless otherwise specified).